Hemp vs Marijuana: What’s the Difference?

It seems like you see the letters CBD everywhere today. You almost forget that not long ago, CBD products weren’t legal in America. What makes CBD legal comes down to its plant source. Following the 2018 Farm Bill, hemp and marijuana are classified as two different substances under the Control Substance Act. That’s because the effects of hemp vs marijuana are very different. This contrast is thanks to how marijuana and hemp affect a network inside of our body, known as the endocannabinoid system. Let’s discuss the differences between hemp and marijuana.

Hemp vs Marijuana: A Difference in Genetics

While hemp and marijuana effects differ, the two plants are siblings from the same family. Marijuana and hemp are both species of the Cannabaceae genus. There are two predominant plants in the Cannabaceae family. They are Cannabis indica and Cannabis sativa.

hemp-vs-marijuana-genetics

Due to it’s sturdier frame and huskier exterior, present-day hemp evolved from Cannabis sativa. Their short and stocky frame cause hemp plants to grow closer together than marijuana plants do, maxing out around 4 inches apart.

Thanks to the hardiness of their fibrous stalks and close proximity to other plants, hemp can withstand many climates. The durability of hemp allows them to reach maturity within 108 to 120 days.

While hemp is just one species of the Cannabaceae genus, marijuana, on the other hand, can be cultivated as either Cannabis indica or Cannabis sativa. That’s where it’s pickiness stops.

To best grow marijuana, you’re going to need warmer climates and more space. These cannabis family members also like breathing room–upwards of six feet between plants! Hey, maybe space is a bit of a good thing. After all, marijuana matures quicker than hemp, as these plants are ready for harvest within 60 to 90 days.

Another glaring difference between hemp and marijuana? Hemp plants are male. Whereas, marijuana is female. Maybe that’s why they mature quicker than hemp plants!

Hemp Effects vs Marijuana Effects

One last difference in the hemp vs marijuana debate might just be the most important. It involves how compounds within these plants interact with our endocannabinoid system.

The endocannabinoid system relies on a series of receptors located throughout our body. These receptors regulate everything from our mental health to hormone production to appetite.

Research indicates hemp effects are very beneficial to the system. The plant is a complete protein containing all the essential amino acids. Hemp effects also include antioxidative and anti-inflammatory benefits. This wide range of qualities is why CBD oil is popping up in everything from beauty lines to supplements to skin care.

Additional research confirms many of the benefits of hemp effects can also be achieved to some degree by marijuana as well. However, there’s one significant difference between how hemp affects the endocannabinoid system vs how marijuana affects it. This primary contrast is that marijuana triggers a psychoactive effect on the endocannabinoid system.

While marijuana can create a euphoric feeling throughout the body, hemp doesn’t have the same effect on the endocannabinoid system. Farm Bill-compliant hemp can’t get you high. The reason for such a variance in cannabis experiences comes down to two molecules–CBD vs THC.

CBD vs THC

What gives plants their distinct attributes are the network of chemical compounds within their DNA. In the Cannabis sativa family, the significant differences between plants come down to plant-based compounds known as cannabinoids.

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Cannabinoids are molecules formed within the oils of the cannabis plant. They are also behind the therapeutic benefits of cannabis.

As the prefix implies, cannabinoids are closely associated with the cannabis family. While other plants do have cannabinoids, none has an abundant supply as members of the Cannabaceae clan. Research indicates that the hemp plant has at least 113 cannabinoids known to humankind.

Think of cannabis plants like men and women. Both genders have estrogen and testosterone in their system. The difference in these levels is what causes one person to grow the characteristics of a male like facial hair or traits of a female such as the growth of breast tissue.

In hemp vs marijuana plants, instead of estrogen or testosterone, their molecular structure depends on the ratio of CBD vs THC.

What Causes Marijuana Effects?

Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol is the THC molecule that gives marijuana its psychoactive or intoxicating characteristics. The THC molecule binds on cannabinoid receptors, creating a euphoric-like feeling on the system.

Under the Farm Bill, hemp plants must have 0.3% THC or less. Due to its low concentration of THC, hemp effects are not psychoactive.  

What Causes Hemp Benefits and Effects?

Cannabidiol (CBD) is predominant in hemp plants and the primary reason for the effects felt from hemp. It works in unison with the other cannabinoids in hemp to help bring homeostasis (balance) to our system.

Unlike THC, the CBD molecule doesn’t bind onto many receptors. Instead, it stimulates stressed receptors, causing a calming-like effect on the body.

CBD can’t get you high. In fact, due to its molecular structure, CBD can even counteract unwanted marijuana effects.   

A History of Hemp CBD Benefits on Ancestors

Back before plants were classified by species and family, our ancestors learned about herbs through trial and error. They would use plants for sustenance and eventually, for medicinal purposes. One of the earliest texts known to humankind is a Hindu work known as The Vedas. This ancient record referenced cannabis as one of the Five Essential Plants.

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When our ancestors migrated, they brought this versatile plant along with them. Chinese emperor Shen-Nung seeped the leaves in a tea to experience hemp effects such as pain relief. Egyptians used cannabis to treat sore eyes. Romans applied hemp extracts to heal sores on both humans and horses.

Our ancestors who went west took hemp along for the journey. As America started colonizing, parts of the country even valued hemp as an acceptable form of payment!

Cannabis was so commonplace that in the 1800s it was an ingredient in many over-the-counter medicines. The plant even landed itself on a list of medicinal herbs in the 1850 US Pharmacopeia.

In 1850, science hadn’t evolved to the point where scientists could differentiate between hemp and marijuana. Cannabis the species was classified like one plant, and this would come to be detrimental in the hemp vs marijuana battle.

Hemp vs Marijuana and Prohibition

In the early 1900s, America was cracking down on mind-altering substances. This change in philosophy caused the country to ban cannabis. During this time, nobody was able to differentiate between hemp and marijuana. They couldn’t figure out that one plant will cause the psychoactive side effects, while the other won’t. Since no one could distinguish between the two, the cannabis ban affected both plants.

With prohibition, companies removed cannabis as an active ingredient in their over-the-counter remedies. Consequently, the masses became deprived of the CBD benefits from ingesting hemp products.

Figuring Out the Difference Between Hemp and Marijuana

In the 1960s, scientists finally discovered the THC molecule. They realized this cannabinoid interacted with the body, fostering the high associated with marijuana effects.

Simultaneously, pharmaceutical companies started to grow. With the industrial revolution, companies began mass-producing medications in the same laboratories that were performing studies on these drugs. With our ever-growing reliance on pharmaceutical remedies, hemp-based care and studies seemed a thing of the past. Therefore, the need to distinguish between hemp and marijuana seemed unnecessary.   

While conventional drugs have a place in wellness, many come with a laundry list of side effects. Just watch one commercial and your head will be spinning. These unfavorable effects led many to look toward a more natural form of therapy that had our ancestors’ approval.

In 1996, medical cannabis became legal in California. However, the groundswell behind the hemp movement didn’t swing into full gear until 2012. This was a landmark year where numerous states voted in favor of medical cannabis. Even then, it wasn’t until 2014 the differences between hemp and marijuana were recognized legally. Still, the laws surrounding cannabis can be tricky and make knowing the difference between hemp and marijuana more crucial than ever.   

Hemp vs Marijuana and the Law

In 2018, Congress signed a new Farm Bill into law. A provision in this legislature saw the differences between hemp and marijuana finally recognized.

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The new Farm Bill reassigned the cultivation of hemp under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) instead of the Department of Justice. With this change of oversight, hemp became reclassified under the Controlled Substance Act.

During prohibition, the Controlled Substance Act classified both hemp and marijuana as cannabis. Unfortunately for those who wanted hemp CBD benefits, all species of cannabis were classified as a schedule 1 controlled substance. That categorization held hemp in the same regard as opioids and meth. It’s also a reason for the long-standing stigma surrounding cannabis products today.

Thanks to the new Farm Bill, which was signed with a hemp pen by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, hemp is currently a schedule 5 substance. While recognizing the differences between hemp and marijuana was vital for CBD legality, it doesn’t make all forms of CBD oil legal. Let’s take a look at the difference between hemp vs marijuana-derived CBD Oil.

What is the Difference Between Hemp and Marijuana Derived CBD Oil?  

CBD derived from hemp plants compliant with the Farm Bill is legal in all 50 states. That’s because these hemp plants have less than 0.3% THC in their genetic makeup. Therefore, companies can use these plants to extract CBD oil without worrying about creating a formula with psychoactive properties.

Almost one-fifth of the states in our country recognizes recreational marijuana. Based on the guidelines of those states, extracting CBD oil from marijuana plants is legal. Therefore, products in states where recreational marijuana is legal may have a higher concentration of THC than the 0.3% in government-mandated hemp. Consequently, these products may cause psychoactive side effects for the person who is using them. Furthermore, the products may become illegal when they cross state lines.

While hemp got a pass during the new Farm Bill, marijuana did not. If you are purchasing CBD oil in a state where recreational marijuana is legal, check out the label. Make sure the CBD oil comes from hemp instead of marijuana.

To further complicate the situation, states which recognize medical marijuana but not recreational, also allow the extraction of CBD oil from marijuana. Medical marijuana cardholders should always have their card inside their wallet, especially when they are traveling with CBD oil. That way, if you do purchase a product in compliance with your state’s medical marijuana program, you will be in accordance with local laws in neighboring states too.

Full Spectrum CBD Oil Benefits

You must be asking yourself, why bother making CBD oil with marijuana if the plant is illegal on a federal level? That’s because there are therapeutic benefits to the THC molecule. In fact, all 113 cannabinoids in the hemp plant (including THC) are rich in antioxidants, fatty acids, and other micronutrients. Though THC found in CBD products is below .3% and not nearly enough to get you high, having a small amount can still provide benefits.

hemp-vs-marijuana-products

 

The primary objective of cannabinoids is homeostasis (balance). They enter the bloodstream in search of angst-ridden receptors throughout the endocannabinoid system. Based on the cannabinoids interaction with the stressed-out receptor, the balance gets restored throughout the network.

Cannabinoids love homeostasis so much they try to accomplish this task as efficiently as possible. Studies suggest cannabinoids have a beneficial effect on one another. Dubbed the entourage effect, cannabinoids exhibit a natural synergy. This unique interaction is what makes the benefits of CBD oil possible for millions.  

Not all CBD oil is created equally. To know you are getting all of the cannabinoids, make sure the label says words such as:

  • Full-Spectrum
  • Broad-Spectrum
  • Whole-Plant

These labels indicate all parts of the hemp plant including its leaves, stems, and seeds were used during the extraction process. This means the formula is enriched with a load of nutrients which subpar, fly by night companies may leave out.

How to Get CBD Oil without the THC Molecule   

There are many reasons for someone to be skeptical of purchasing a product with THC. For one, you may have a sensitive endocannabinoid system. Others may be afraid of unknowingly breaking the law. If this sounds like you, you can still experience the benefits of CBD oil.

At Made by Hemp, we produce phytocannabinoid rich hemp oil without any THC. While the THC molecule does exhibit therapeutic benefits, it is not necessarily needed in CBD products, though as highlighted above can prove beneficial. 

CBD products made with CBD isolate are THC free.

Hemp vs Marijuana Uses

With marijuana being abundant in THC, it is mostly used for its psychoactive properties and medicinal benefits. States with laws allowing for both recreational and medical marijuana have laws for when, where and how to use these products.

Hemp, on the other hand, has historically been used for more industrial purposes like clothing, biofuel, food products, paper, and more. With the recent rise in popularity as a supplement, CBD derived from hemp is making this plant popular again, and helping companies like ours to educate more people on the benefits of hemp vs marijuana as a supplement.

Conclusion

Now you know the difference, spread the word! Help others to understand this important concept about the difference between hemp and marijuana. There are many epidemics going on in the world today such as deforestation, sickness and disease, opioid addiction and more which more studies and research could provide insight into how the hemp plant and its constituents could prove important in these issues and more.

Stay up to date with our educational information, new research and never miss a sale by joining our newsletter!

 

This article originally appeared on MadeByHemp.com

Hemp How-to: Guide to Storing CBD Products and Other Hemp Supplements

Properly storing CBD products and other hemp oil supplements is key to preserving their freshness and making sure the cannabinoids don’t degrade or break down prematurely. You want to be able to get the maximum benefits from these products, and by observing the best practice when it comes to storing them, you don’t only extend their shelf life, you also preserve their potency.

There are three things hemp oil supplements don’t get along well with heat, light, and oxygen. So to make sure your CBD products are not compromised, always keep them in a place where these elements are well controlled. Here are a few things you need to remember when it comes to storing CBD products:

  1. Store CBD products in a cool place

Prolonged exposure to heat will definitely ruin your stash of hemp oil supplements and other CBD products. If you’re looking for a place to store them, make sure it’s never near appliances that produce heat like an oven, dryer, heater, or even the refrigerator. CBD oil does not have to be refrigerated, however, if you live in a hot, humid place it is a good idea to store it inside the fridge. The low temperature inside the fridge might thicken your CBD oil, so if this happens, just place the bottle under warm water and it should be ready for consumption in a few minutes.

Another thing to avoid is leaving your CBD products in the car. It could get really hot in there, and this condition could cause the cannabinoids to degrade and lose some of its therapeutic properties.

How-to-Store-CBD-Hemp-Oil-CVR 2

2. Keep CBD products out of direct sunlight

Like other similar neutraceuticals, CBD products and other hemp oil supplements could lose their efficacy when exposed to direct sunlight. Always keep them in their original bottles, which are usually opaque, as they’re designed to protect contents from light damage. Store in a dark cool place, away from open windows.

Along these same lines, be sure when buying CBD oil to look out for products which are sold in clear bottles or containers. The packaging may look beautiful, but being in a clear bottle means its cannabinoid content will degrade more quickly due to the extra light exposure.

Who remembers this old Sam Adams commercial? What they talk about here is exactly what happens to cannabidiol products…

3. Keep CBD products sealed in air-tight containers

Oxygen can also contribute to the breakdown of natural cannabinoids, and could leave your precious CBD products less effective. This is why they usually come in air-tight containers that are specifically designed to keep the contents protected from air exposure. When storing CBD oil, make it a habit to double check if the lid or cap is properly and tightly closed after each use, to make sure air doesn’t seep in. Also, be sure to only buy CBD oil which comes in a completely sealed container. If the seal is broken, ask for a new one. 

How Long Does CBD Last Once Open?

After you’ve opened your CBD oil, you may be wondering what just happened to the shelf life. We analyzed CBD products from several major brands and found that most have an expiration date of one or two years, if refrigerated. Outside of the refrigerator, you can still expect a year shelf life if stored away from light, heat, and humidity.

How to tell if CBD Oil Has Gone Bad

Typically, a CBD supplement gets used far before it nears the end of its shelf life. However, it’s always good to know the signs of an expired hemp product.

If you’re new to CBD oil, take a moment to smell your product the first time you open it. In general, hemp oil has an aromatic and herbal smell. However, there are endless formulations out there that can affect the scent. Depending on the product, it could smell like olive oil, mint leaves, or any number of essential oils that may be used.

But once hemp oil goes bad, it’s bad. The once pleasant aroma turns unmistakeably rancid.

 

[RELATED ARTICLE: Full Spectrum CBD, Broad Spectrum CBD, Isolate, and PCR: Decoding the Difference]

 

Final Thoughts

CBD products and other hemp oil supplements usually last a year, if properly stored. Proper storage can definitely prevent degradation of cannabinoids and make sure you get the most out of them. However, you also have to consider other factors, like the method of preparation, ingredients used, and the actual finished product. CBD and hemp extracts typically have carrier oils, for example, and the shelf life of the product can be influenced by these base oils. In these cases, it’s best that you store them the way you would store their base oils, the most common being olive oil, MCT oil, and coconut oil.

If you choose to cook or bake with your hemp oil supplements, these can also contain perishable ingredients. These would expire more quickly, than say, capsules and oils, and would have the same storage requirements as their non-CBD versions.

 

This article first appeared on MadeByhemp.com

CBDa: More Than Just the Precursor to CBD?

CBDa-front-cover

Would you consider eating a hemp leaf? It sounds very natural, but early research suggests that compounds in the raw cannabis plant may provide distinct health benefits. One of these compounds is cannabidiolic acid (CBDa), the precursor to the well-known cannabidiol (CBD) compound. 

In a natural state, the hemp plant contains over 85 active compounds called cannabinoids. These compounds are secreted in a sticky resin through the trichomes (glands) of the cannabis plant. 

When the hemp plant is processed, cannabinoids can be changed or removed. The final hemp product can contain one cannabinoid or all the available cannabinoids depending on how it is manufactured. 

Environmental factors such as heat, air, and light can also affect what cannabinoids are present in the plant. Cannabinoids levels will vary slightly between each plant—even those that are grown right next to one another! 

With the amount of emphasis that is placed on CBD, it may be surprising to learn that the raw hemp plant contains very little CBD. Instead, it contains an abundance of CBDa (the ratio is about 95% CBDa to 5% CBD at the highest.) 

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Through a process called decarboxylation, CBDa is heated to break down the acidic form. What is left is referred to as “activated” CBD (cannabinoids in their acidic form have been considered “inactive”.) CBDa also converts to CBD naturally by way of time and heat. 

We are familiar with CBD because of its therapeutic potential. In the past, CBD has been viewed as the more “important” cannabinoid and manufacturers have intentionally converted CBDa into CBD. Today, most CBD products are decarboxylated and contain little CBDa. 

CBDa: More Than Just the Precursor to CBD? 

Researchers are finding the “inactive” status of CBDa may not be entirely accurate. The compound provides its own set of benefits that are still being uncovered. 

As of now, there has been far less research on CBDa than CBD. So far, all studies are at the preclinical stage, meaning they are carried out on cell cultures or animal models. In preclinical studies, CBDa has been studied for the treatment of nausea, inflammation, and epilepsy. The results are significant enough that further research is being explored. 

Like CBD, CBDa is non-intoxicating. However, CBDa is used by the body differently than CBD. Studies suggest that CBDa may not interact with the endocannabinoid system; rather, CBDa affects other non-endocannabinoid receptors and enzymes. 

If you are interested in the specific benefits of CBDa, we suggest performing a quick Google search for the preclinical studies. As of now, FDA regulations prevent us from presenting the specifics regarding research. 

 

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Which is Better: CBD or CBDa? 

There is no one “best” cannabinoid; however, there are cannabinoids that have been more thoroughly studied. To determine which cannabinoids are best suited for your situation, we recommend researching the benefits of each. 

Oftentimes, it is a combination of cannabinoids that suit our bodies best. During what is known as the entourage effect, compounds such as cannabinoids and terpenes work with one another to produce an effect greater than the compound alone. It is suggested that taking CBD and CBDa together may provide more benefit than taking the compounds alone. 

As of now, research is attentive to CBD and the market will reflect such. As more research is conducted on CBDa, we predict to see a greater emphasis on this cannabinoid. 

 

This article originally appeared on MadeByHemp.com

Healthy Hemp Pudding Recipe

Bring donuts to work and suddenly your co-workers will like you a little more.

Bring hemp oil pudding to work, and what do you get? A little confusion…but at least they’re snacking healthy.

I could talk about the healthiness of hemp all day long, but I never thought I’d be making a dessert with it. It’s truly the best of both worlds; delicious cacao and all the nutritional benefits of hemp seeds. The reason I was shocked by how sweet hemp oil pudding tastes is that, generally, hemp products have a very distinct taste to them.

What do hemp seeds taste like?

Have you tried hemp seeds? Speaking from embarrassing experience, get the shelled version for when you’re on the go, otherwise, you’ll have teeny brown shells plastered to your teeth.

If you have tried hemp seeds before, then you know what I’m talking about. They taste great, similar to sunflower seeds or more like an almond butter if you have the shelled version. They have this rich, nutty flavor that’s great in protein shakes, but you probably don’t think of dessert when nibbling on them.

You’ll have a new appreciation after following this recipe.

How healthy are hemp seeds?

You can add shelled hemp seeds to just about any food to add drastic nutritional value. The first thing I like to show people interested in hemp foods is the supplement facts on the back of a bag of hemp seeds. The protein, omega-3, omega-6, vitamin, and mineral count blows all unsuspecting guests away.

Just look at the image below.

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To list just a few, this little grab bag has the following quantities in every 5 Tablespoons:

  • 18g fat
  • 15g dietary fiber
  • 13g protein
  • 50% magnesium
  • 6% calcium
  • 35% iron
  • 20% zinc

Now, let’s look at the ingredient list: organic hemp seed and sea salt. There’s just something so fulfilling about knowing you’re eating actual food, not something manufactured to…let’s face it, resemble food.

The nutritional perks of hemp seeds come right from the hemp plant, nothing artificially added.

That’s great, now how do I make hemp pudding?

Okay, let’s get virtual cooking!

This is what you’ll need:

  • 2/3 cup of pitted dates
  • ½ cup of water
  • 2/3 cup of ice
  • 1 cup of hemp seeds (we recommend shelled seeds)
  • 1/8 cup of cacao powder
  • A pinch of vanilla bean powder
  • Optionally, you can add some berries of your choice to throw on top when you’re done.

Here’s how to do it:

  • Add dates, water, and ice into a blender
  • Blend until you have a paste
  • Add the hemp seeds, cacao powder, and vanilla bean powder
  • Blend until it looks creamy
  • Eat it (oh, and add some berries on top if you so choose)

If you try this recipe, let us know what you think!

Personally, when I’m feeling sick the only thing I can tolerate is soft foods like yogurt and…mashed potatoes. I’ve been fortunate enough that my immune system has been on it’s A-game this past year, but I think this recipe will be great when sick (and stubborn with food) to get some much-needed nutrition.

Enjoy!
This article originally appeared on MadeByHemp.com

What is Industrial Hemp (and Where Does it Come From?)

This article first appeared on MadeByHemp.com

 

Hemp is a variety of the cannabis plant that is grown for industrial purpose. The emphasis here is placed on industrial. Unlike marijuana, a cannabis plant used for recreational and medical purposes, hemp has many—you got it—industrial uses, including paper, textiles, plastics, construction, food, and fuel.

Hemp also contains low levels of THC, the infamous psychoactive compound. Instead, hemp is bred to have high levels of CBD, a legal and non-intoxicating compound. Many people take hemp-derived CBD oil as a daily supplement to support a balanced endocannabinoid system and to target specific concerns without a high.

 

To better understand the versatility of the hemp plant, let’s dive into the basics of hemp: how it’s grown, where it comes from, and how it’s used.

 

Growing Industrial Hemp

 

Hemp appeals to farmers because it grows rapidly (maturing in 8-12 weeks), calls for less water than other crops, and does not require pesticides. This renewable source also receives praise for its benefit to the environment. Hemp draws in CO2, prevents soil erosion, and provides nutrients to the soil after harvest.

Additionally, hemp is a bio-accumulator, meaning it pulls substances from the soil. This gives hemp the unique ability to detoxify soil, which has been taken advantage of in areas such as Chernobyl, where agricultural land was contaminated by a nuclear disaster.

 

Where Does Hemp Come From?

 

Hemp can be grown in most of the world and hemp companies source from different locations. We primarily source from our farms in both Kentucky and Colorado.

Hemp Through the Years

 

For a time, hemp was only legal in the United States if it was imported. The Controlled Substances Act of 1970 classified cannabis as a Schedule I drug, which made it illegal to grow hemp in the United States. However, hemp could be imported from other countries, provided it contained less than 0.3% THC. This prohibition marred the industrial uses of hemp and made hemp legally unidentifiable from marijuana.

 

This changed when the 2014 Farm Bill was passed, followed by the 2018 Farm Bill.

 

About every five years, a farm bill is passed to create and reauthorize federal programs. In 2014, the farm bill included an amendment that permitted states to pass industrial hemp pilot programs and research.

 

The amendment defines industrial hemp as separate from marijuana if it produces a product with less than 0.3% THC. It also gives institutions of higher education and state departments of agriculture the authorization to regulate and conduct hemp research and pilot programs, if it is in a state that has legalized hemp cultivation.So, the 2014 Farm Bill made it legal for manufacturers to source hemp-derived CBD from the United States. The passing of this amendment has, and continues to, benefit U.S. farmers and businesses.

Fast forward to the passing of the 2018 Farm Bill, hemp was made legal throughout the U.S., so more farmers are beginning to grow up. This should create more competition and help reduce the cost of CBD oil over time.

 

Since 2014, United States hemp production has begun to flourish. Now in 2019, U.S. farmers have had several years to acclimate to the crop. As the quality of domestic hemp increases, we are finding more CBD manufacturers moving toward domestic sources. Over the next decade, we predict that the United States will become a leader in hemp production.

 

Uses for hemp

Application of Hemp

Hemp is a renewable resource and can be used to create thousands of products.

Hemp also contains active compounds called cannabinoids, such as CBD.  In the past several years, there has been an influx of personal testimonies and research promoting the benefits of CBD. With this information, we are learning that hemp is even more than its industrial application.

The versatility of hemp has been recognized for centuries. For a period, the benefit of hemp was overshadowed by marijuana. In the past decade, however, there has been a resurgence in the hemp industry as the stigma of cannabis begins to dissolve. As the recognition of hemp expands, we expect to see an increase in the application and research of hemp.

In Health,

Shaline